Why F-Secure and Others Are Opposing the Snoopers’ Charter

whatsapp logoIt’s widely expected that next week the government will unveil details of its hugely controversial Snoopers’ Charter, aka the Investigatory Powers Bill. To preempt this and in a bid to influence the debate cyber security firm F-Secure and 40 other tech signatories presented an open letter opposing the act.

The bill most controversially is expected to force service providers to allow the authorities to decrypt secret messages if requested to do so in extremis. This is most likely going to come in the form some kind of order effectively banning end-to-end encryption.

I heard from F-Secure security adviser Sean Sullivan on this to find out why the bill is such as bad idea.

To precis what I wrote in this Infosecurity article, his main arguments are that forcing providers to hold the encryption keys will:

  • Make them a likely target for hackers, weakening security
  • Send the wrong signal out to the world and damage UK businesses selling into a global marketplace
  • End up in China or other potentially hostile states a service provider also operates in also requesting these encryption keys – undermining security further
  • Be useless, as the bad guys will end up using another platform which can’t be intercepted

I completely agree. Especially with Sullivan’s argument that the providers would become a major target for hackers.

“End-to-end encryption makes good sense and is the future of security,” he told me by email. “Asking us to compromise our product, service, and back end would be foolish – especially considering all of the back end data breach failures that have occurred of late. If we don’t hold the data, we cannot lose control of it. That’s just good security.”

One other point he made was the confusion among politicians about tech terminology as basic as “backdoor” and “encryption”.

“A lot of UK politicians end up putting their foot in their mouth because they don’t properly understand the technology. They try to repeat what their experts have told them, but they get it wrong. UK law enforcement would probably love to backdoor your local device (phone) but that’s a lost cause,” he argued.

“The politicians (who actually know what they’re talking about) really just want back end access. As in, they want a back door in the ‘cloud’. They want to mandate warranted access to data in transit and/or in the back end (rather than data at rest on the device) and fear that apps which offer end-to-end encryption, in which the service provider doesn’t hold any decryption keys, are a threat.”

Let’s see what happens, but given the extremely low technology literacy levels among most politicians I’ve got a bad feeling about this one.

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